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Your guide to Mission Creek: Sunday

Deerhoof

If you aren’t familiar with San Francisco’s Deerhoof, listen to “We Do Parties” and “There’s That Grin” off their 2012 album Breakup Song.

Well, it’s the last day of Mission Creek! I’m both ready to get my life back to normal and sad for the week’s excitement to end. Hopefully this guide has helped you navigate and maximize your fun this week, and luckily, today the schedule is straightforward and free of conflicts.

If you make it out of bed in time, head to The Mill for the Carnivore Brunch (12:00 p.m.). Chicken and waffles, grits and grillades…‘nuff said!

Afterward, one of my favorite parts of the literary side of Mission Creek is Spoken Word at The Englert (7:00 p.m.), with participants including Amber Tamblyn, Emily Wells, Beau Sia and countless others. Rest assured, this show features a who’s who of spoken word artists and is sure to be a blast for word nerds and music fans alike. More details available here.


Closing the festival tonight is a show at The Mill, which is fitting since we started this week-long binge on literature, music, food and, most likely, alcohol there. Love Songs For Lonely Monsters will take the stage at 8:00 p.m. (listen). Then Iowa City’s Wet Hair will go on around 9:00 p.m. (listen). And finally, Deerhoof will end the night beginning around 10:15 p.m. If you aren’t familiar with San Francisco’s Deerhoof, listen to “We Do Parties” and “There’s That Grin” off their 2012 album Breakup Song.


I almost ended this post by saying “See you all next year!” but that seems silly. There are always tons of cool events, readings and shows happening here, and I look forward to taking advantage of all the culture this little city has to offer until Mission Creek 2014 and beyond.

Comments



One thought on “Your guide to Mission Creek: Sunday

  1. Edward Rosebush June 2, 2013 at 2:06 am - Reply

    Love songs can be found in the histories and cultures of most societies, though their ubiquity is a modern phenomenon. A highly controversial and startling explanation of the genesis of love songs can be found in Denis de Rougemont’s “Love in the Western World”. De Rougemont’s thesis is that love songs grew out of the courtly love songs of the troubadours, and that those songs represented a rejection of the historical Christian notion of love. ^.`*

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