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Brothers Bar and Grill kicks off misogynist social media campaign


A favorite among  a large swath of undergrads, Brothers Bar and Grill rarely lacks a crowd. -- photo by Alan Light
As a favorite among undergrads, Brothers Bar and Grill rarely lacks a crowd. — photo by Alan Light

A fine line exists between risque bar promotions and foolish ones.

With a recent promoted post on Twitter, Brothers Bar and Grill gleefully leaps over that line and finds itself waist-deep in “what the fuck are you thinking?” territory.

“Hacked shots of celebs are free. Redheaded shots are just $3. All three seem pretty cheap these days,” the post reads, alluding to the Aug. 31 theft of nearly 200 celebrity photos and national fervor that followed. The incident launched a nationwide discussion over the culture of acceptance, and rampant victim blaming, that permeates incidents of “leaked celebrity nudes.”

The theft prompted an investigation by the FBI’s Los Angeles office, and sparked a broader debate over whether the victims were to blame for having the photos in the first place — a sentiment that elicited disgust from many, including those in Hollywood.

Lena Dunham of HBO’s Girls wrote on Twitter, “The ‘don’t take naked pics if you don’t want them online’ argument is the ‘she was wearing a short skirt’ of the web.” Actress Emma Watson noted, “Even worse than seeing women’s privacy violated on social media is reading the accompanying comments that show such a lack of empathy.”

brothers

Brothers’ contribution to this discussion? These women — who watched as the world gobbled up private photos stolen from their private devices — are cheap, just like our drinks. The promotion is for a cocktail commonly known as a “Red Headed Slut,” no less.

Brothers' South Bend, Indiana promotion caught the attention of several, including the school's feminist student union.
Brothers in South Bend, Indiana caught the attention of several, including the school’s feminist student union.
Get it? It’s hilarious.

The Iowa City bar published the tweet on Sept. 26 as part of a nationwide campaign (identical promotions are featured at various Brothers locations across the Midwest), in addition to running the promotion on its Facebook page the previous day.

Brothers Bar and Grill’s corporate office, located in LaCrosse, Wisconsin, has not yet responded to Little Village’s requests for comment.

Incidentally, a bar patrol report released earlier this month by the City of Iowa City shows that more than a quarter of Iowa City’s underage drinking citations over the last 12 months were issued within Brothers Bar and Grill.

Who would have thought?

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Comments:

  1. Whatever. If YOU are ignorant enough to post naked pics on the net then I don’t feel sorry for you. 2nd grade kids know things are not ever secure on the net. Grow up.

    1. These women did not post naked photos on the internet, hence the need to “hack” to gain access to them. Instead, they saved these private images to a secure cloud. This is a normal decision made by millions of people who want to maintain their privacy. Hackers broke through many security networks and incriptions with the sole intent of stealing these images and violating these women’s privacy by violating their bodies.

      1. Its wrong to hack people’s online accounts, and steal their private photographs. But I don’t particularly care that it happens (I don’t have the emotional energy to worry about every unfortunate thing that occurs on planet Earth), and I surely don’t feel any sympathy for a gaggle of bubble-brained celebutards who’s sole currency is that men like the way they look. These people are multi-millionaires who scarcely have jobs of any kind, again, based almost entirely on the fact men dig the way they look. So I guess they should store their naked pics offline, eh?

    2. She didn’t post them on the internet, though, she sent them to her boyfriend. Someone’s reading comprehension needs work.

  2. Hacked shots of celebrities are a thing. $3 shots are a second thing. “All three” refers to what third thing? I would be more concerned with a business that I’d want to give me correct change failing so egregiously at very simple math than I would with subjective perceptions of “misogyny.” Misogyny is also a thing. It is a shameful, backward thing. It is not a thing lurking behind every tree and every prudish judgment a mathematically incompetent bar owner might say, however. Somebody over there thinks people who have naked pictures of themselves seem cheap. You have to really twist that to make misogyny of it.

  3. Thanks for your honest and dry sense of humor. What the fuck…truly. it is good to keep speaking the truth about the climate of relationships between men and women and in regards to sexuality. The truth is that woman and her sexuality are still for sale as an acceptable way of being in relations with her. Her sexuality and which is truly her sensuality. ..A deep connection to all that it means to be female…is not safe. Especially if she expresses it. And yes she needs to understand this power and not use it to seduce in order to regain power lost. But we need to find compassion for this wounded sexuality that we experience as a culture on many levels. Stop with the arguments of who is right and start to move into our hearts so that we may start to walk the healing path. Let us have real conversations. Thank you little village for your part in starting the conversation.

  4. Its wrong to hack people’s online accounts, and steal their private photographs. But I don’t particularly care that it happens (I don’t have the emotional energy to worry about every unfortunate thing that occurs on planet Earth), and I surely don’t feel any sympathy for a gaggle of bubble-brained celebutards who’s sole currency is that men like the way they look. These people are multi-millionaires who scarcely have jobs of any kind, again, based almost entirely on the fact men dig the way they look. So I guess they should store their naked pics offline, eh?

  5. i don’t care about what you think is right or wrong. No one should. Don’t expect other people to have the same morals as you. If you come across someone with different morals, lock up your house, carry a gun, and don’t put pictures online. Trust no one!

    That is the conservavive arg.

    This is the libral arg:

    Everyone in the world should have the same morals. One of these morals is: It is wrong to look at naked people who don’t want to be looked at. If we all agree to these standards then we can safely go about our lives and we can trust eachother that eachother has eachother’s best interests in mind. If we can do that then we can be happy.

    As you can see, both arguments aren’t even talking about the same things. One is a lesson in self-defense. The other is just sad that the world is not as happy of a place as we thought.

  6. As a woman I’m not even remotely offended. Do I think security in the tech world is lack, you bet, but do I think someone hacking and intercepting texted/clouded pics is ‘sexual assault’ no. I’ve been sexually assaulted, it sucks a lot more than any of that. It’s a violation sure to think that people are out jackin’ it to your picture but someone making light of the situation shouldn’t be roasted alive. I often wonder how we’d be treating this if it was male nudes and males who had their privacy invaded. My concern comes from having a drink called a red headed slut? What does that even imply? And what third thing do they refer to. Poorly executed ad but not terribly offensive or ‘enabling’.

  7. I think the third thing referred to is perhaps “heads”? If you try to see a reference to the ISIS beheadings in the ad, it actually makes the whole thing pretty complex. The ad builds a tableau of the modern media gestalt: ISIS, Feminism, the thirst for pornography and protection of anonymity behind the screen, represented by the phone (an iPhone 6, perhaps bent in a suggestive manner, would have been perfect). They awkwardly try to express their discomfort in a world they don’t understand or fit in anymore. Defensively, it all seems kind of cheap, they seem to mutter, as they offer up a red-headed “shot”.

    Of course, this is all completely ignoring how problematic the religious iconography of that Jaegermeister logo makes the ad, but yeah. It’s Brothers!

  8. This bar should be shut down. It’s has had so many problems in the past that people don’t talk about. Like NOT stopping assaults on women and allowing men to act in such a way that most other bars would kick them out for good. This bar breeds douche bags and rapists. Respect women and their bodies.

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