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‘A Quiet Place,’ written and produced by Iowans, was made for thriller fans

A Quiet Place, floating on a cloud of high praise and a big opening weekend, has perhaps been overinflated. Nevertheless, the suspense-thriller, penned by Iowan filmmakers, is deliciously unsettling. […]

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Rest easy, Iowa City: ‘The Miracle Season’ is good, or at least good enough

If you’re like me, you’ve been nervous about the story of Caroline Found and the 2011 West High volleyball team being “Soul Surfer”-fied. But rest assured, the film holds up. Here are the highs, lows and uncanny bits about watching a very Iowa City story on the big screen. […]

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Vino Vérité presents a grittier sort of foodie documentary

Fans of chef-focused, “food porn” documentaries like Chef’s Table or Anthony Bourdain’s The Mind of a Chef will enjoy 42 Grams, a somewhat gritty documentary following a Chicago chef’s journey from underground food to a critically acclaimed restaurant. […]

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A story divided: I, TONYA’s deft perspective shifts

I, Tonya Film Scene — opens Friday, Jan. 12 For people of a certain age, the 1994 incident involving Olympic figure skater Tonya Harding and a premeditated attack on her team-rival Nancy Kerrigan has a permanent place in the memory banks. Many recall those events very clearly, as well as the drama that played out […]

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A-List: ‘Saving Brinton’ explores a forgotten chapter of the silent film era

Setting up in small towns from Minnesota to Texas, the Brintons’ traveling cinema show was for most Midwesterners of the era a first encounter with moving images. Unfortunately, in 1919, seemingly at the height of the traveling show’s popularity, Frank Brinton passed away. When his wife died in 1955, her estate’s executor moved the collection to his basement — where it remained until Mike Zahs learned of its existence in 1981. […]

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The smiling ‘Lady Macbeth’ — stark period horror comes to Film Scene

On their wedding night, Katherine’s husband, Alexander, asks if she is cold, and asserts, “This house gets very cold.” But Katherine smiles at him reassuringly and insists in earnest, “I’m thick-skinned.” It’s the last time Katherine will appear so innocent and eager-to-please, but she is not wrong. Her skin proves to be very thick indeed. […]

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Interview: Filmmaker David Byars discusses the Patriot movement ahead of Vino Vérité’s screening of ‘No Man’s Land’

This Sunday, July 9, documentarian David Byars is bringing his incendiary new film, No Man’s Land, to FilmScene as part of the Vino Vérité series, presented by FilmScene, ‘Little Village’ and Bread Garden Market. Tickets are $20 for FilmScene members, $25 for the general public. The film begins at 7:15 p.m., with hors d’oeuvres & wine tasting preceding at 6:30 p.m. A wine and dessert reception with the filmmaker begins at 8:45 p.m. […]

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Tight, entertaining ‘Colossal’ makes its own rules

Spanish filmmaker Nacho Vigalondo’s latest film, Colossal, is at once an intimate substance abuse drama and a kaiju-style creature feature. Much like his previous feature films, including Timecrimes (2007) and Extraterrestrial (2011), Vigalondo is able to strike this seemingly-odd balance with surprising grace simply by setting a very real, very interior story against a distant backdrop of intense science fiction. […]

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After Birth: With Nate Parker’s ‘The Birth of a Nation,’ a page has decisively turned

The Birth of a Nation FilmScene — opens Friday, Oct. 7 at 1 p.m. A century after D.W. Griffith released The Birth of a Nation (1915), one of the most groundbreaking of all movies, as well as a classic of American racism, we now get Nate Parker’s The Birth of a Nation, an overwhelming, sympathetic […]

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Oscars Round Up: ‘Fury Road’ has an inventiveness rarely seen in action films

For the final installment of our Oscars Round Up series, Pat Brown gives his take on a film with a staggering 10 Oscar nominations. Second only to ‘The Revenant,’ ‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ has gotten the nod in categories from Best Picture and Best Director (George Miller) to Best Visual Effects and Best Sound Design. […]

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Oscars Round Up: Lenny Abrahamson’s ‘Room’ tugs mercilessly at our perceptions

The LV film team has been loving this series, highlighting Oscar nominees in advance of Sunday’s awards ceremony. First, John Rigby discussed ‘45 Years,’ next was Warren Sprouse’s ‘Theeb‘ review and, yesterday, Matthew Byrd checked in with his take on ‘Brooklyn.’ Today, Jaret Morlan (who wrote the piece on Sunday’s Oscar watch party for Issue […]

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