Advertisement

Sample music from the Landfall Festival, marking its 10th year in Cedar Rapids this week

Posted by Rob Cline | Sep 12, 2017 | Arts & Entertainment

Landfall Festival of World Music

various venues — through Saturday, Sept. 16

UK-based sitarist Roopa Panesar will give a demonstration on Tuesday, Sept. 12 at noon and perform Wednesday, Sept. 13 at 7 p.m. as part of the Landfall Festival. — photo by Eastwest Photography

The tenth edition of the Landfall Festival of World Music is underway with more than 35 artists taking to the CSPS Hall stage as well as the Cedar Rapids Public Library and NewBo City Market. As always, the festival, which is produced by Legion Arts, includes musicians from around the globe.

Performers include Ranky Tanky, a South Carolina ensemble devoted to maintaining and expanding the Gullah tradition of the Georgia and Carolina Sea Islands — the music of slaves that maintained strong African underpinnings. The group visited Johnson Elementary School on Monday, Sept. 11 and performs at CSPS on Tuesday, Sept. 12 at 7 p.m. and at NewBo City Market on Friday, Sept. 15 at 4 p.m.

Others on the docket include Mdou Moctar, a storied guitarist hailing from Abalak in the Azawagh desert of Niger; Landama, an ensemble of women from across the Americas committed to helping youth discover the joy of music making; Pascuala Ilabaca, a Chilean singer-songwriter who knows her way around an accordion; and Maria Pomianowska, a Polish composer and musician who reconstructed the Bilgoraj suka, a medieval forerunner to the violin. Acclaimed sitar player Roopa Panesar and the bilingual, electro-acoustic Oakland band Bang Data are also on the schedule.

Audience members are encouraged to donate $10 for each concert they attend, but the events are not ticketed.

More information, including the full schedule, can be found on the Legion Arts website.


Add a comment

*Please complete all fields correctly

WHAT TO READ NEXT

Posted by mike-kuhlenbeck
FilmScene and the Bijou Film Board will host a special screening of the new documentary Whose Streets? with a panel discussion at the 5 p.m. showing, as part of Art...
Posted by kembrew
Musicians Kevin Shea and Matthew Mottel dubbed themselves Talibam! because it was the most unhip name they could think of, especially compared to the then-current new crop of Brooklyn groups...
Posted by leah-vonderheide
Setting up in small towns from Minnesota to Texas, the Brintons’ traveling cinema show was for most Midwesterners of the era a first encounter with moving images. Unfortunately, in 1919,...

BUY HALF-PRICE GIFT CARDS